Archive for the cancer charities Category

Can there be too many charities?

Can there be too many charities?

  I think you would have had to be living underground, for a few weeks not to have heard about the Ice Bucket Challenge, which I wrote about last week. In fact this week seems to have been even busier on that subject, with all channels of social media full of people pouring water on their head  in the name of charity. Of course, we had the side show arguments about who owned the challenge and who should benefit from the cash and the awareness, but this got me thinking even more about our perception of charities and how and why we support them. One of the things that I experience when I meet people who have been through something as life changing as a cancer diagnosis, is a desire

Fundraising and the #IceBucketChallenge

Fundraising and the #IceBucketChallenge

Normally when I select a subject to write about I try and choose one that is rarely discussed. But today I have broken my own rule by selecting the Ice Bucket Challenge. I am on social media a lot, and this is the one subject that has dominated my feeds this week. I have even read many pieces in the press about it, so I thought if I can’t beat them I will join them, and add some of my own thoughts to the debate. Firstly I have to declare, that I have my own fund within my hospital, which I raise money for on an ad hoc basis, to purchase specialist equipment for the ward that looks after me. There are no admin costs to run the fund and I discuss with

The gold standard in cancer support

The gold standard in cancer support

  In my previous post, I mentioned that I had been invited to stay at a hotel for people affected by cancer and life threatening illnesses. That experience was probably one of the most uplifting I have had in recent years, but yet again I am writing this post with a large degree of frustration, and as we get further into the piece you will understand why. I consider myself very privileged to do the work I do and meet so many wonderful people. The ‘asks’ I receive are varied, but I will only ever consider projects if I can see some tangible results in the short term. So when I was invited to visit  The Grove Hotel in Bournemouth and check out their facilities for people affected by cancer, I was

Is corporation stifling innovation?

Is corporation stifling innovation?

This week has been one of my busiest in recent times, with a variety of engagements fulfilled, meeting many different people, from patients to Chief Executives. I have also done several presentations to different audiences. Firstly I’m grateful that currently my health is holding, enabling me to do these, but secondly it is a great opportunity to continue to find out personally what is going on in the world of cancer support. Reading and talking is one thing, but there is nothing like first hand experience. I would like to think that my previous business life, and my current patient experience gives me a unique perspective on things. But I have to admit to writing this piece with a dark cloud of frustration hanging over me. There was a constant theme during

Has cancer made me selfish?

Has cancer made me selfish?

I know, no one likes to consider themselves as selfish, especially me! But my encounter with cancer has made me wonder. Other people are always my concern, and the joy I receive in my life has always come from doing things for others. However, when cancer struck, my world turned on it’s head. Instead of me being a part of my family focus, I became the entire focus. Every where I went, people wanted to know about what was happening to me. Of course, I spent a long time in hospital, with chemotherapy, transplant and various complications, and I was the focus there too. Due to the complexities of my disease and treatment I required a lot of time and care from people. I was a very good giver, but a

Macmillan’s Annual Corporate Partner Event – Macmillan Cancer Voice, Chris Lewis

Macmillan's Annual Corporate Partner Event - Macmillan Cancer Voice, Chris Lewis

 I am very pleased to be an official Support Partner of  The Grove Hotel in Bournemouth, which is the only hotel in the UK specifically for people affected by  cancer.

Healthcare must quickly learn to embrace social media.

Healthcare must quickly learn to embrace social media.

This past week has been a particularly varied one, which is what I really enjoy. I have done some speaking, writing, and lots of personal engagement. I have received some fantastic feedback from last week’s post, and have been involved in some very fruitful dialogue. What I try and do with my writing is to stimulate thought and discussion. Cancer is such an emotive subject, and we will all have our opinions. There is no right and wrong, only what feels right for you. I am happy to share my thoughts to open up a conversation. I have been grateful, particularly to the many people affected by pancreatic cancer who contacted me, to talk about their work. Thank you, I learned a lot! I was invited to join a ‘tweet

We have the tools and things must improve!

We have the tools and things must improve!

This week has been treatment week, so Monday and Tuesday are filled up, but I always try and make the most of my time, and am generally communicating via Twitter or talking to staff and patients. I have a continual thirst for information.I managed to talk to a good number of patients, and also a couple of very senior Health Professionals.   As you know, my ‘crusade’ is to improve support for people affected by cancer. Obviously, I make my own observations of things, during my endless visits to hospitals, but I am intrigued to see how other people view their situation. Do patients feel that things could be improved or are they content with what is being done? I also wonder if Health Professionals feel that more should be

Translate »