Archive for the Cancer Support Category

The Importance Of Our Online Communities.

The Importance Of Our Online Communities.

For the last two years or so I have become part of the cancer blogging community. I guess like for most of us who started writing it was a way of raising awareness of cancer issues, whilst also going through your own treatment. It meant that on days you felt unwell, you were able to do a bit of writing, so your time wasn’t totally wasted. There are many in this community who were in fact journalists or writers themselves before they got sick, but most of us just took to the internet with no prior skills, to let others know about what we were going through. When I first started I had never written anything before and was concerned that people were going to compare my work with others, but

“Cancer won’t stop my education!” Emily’s story

"Cancer won't stop my education!" Emily's story

I make no apology for this blog being a little longer than usual as Emily is a young lady I admire greatly! At the age of 16 she was diagnosed with Non Hodgkin’s Lymphoma, but has not let cancer get in the way of living her life. Along with all the things young people do, Emily runs her own website to work with other young people around the world. What I find personally refreshing about Emily, is that she is forever smiling, and will not let cancer stop her from achieving her goals. We tend to assume that it is mostly older people that are affected by cancer but in this piece we are given an insight into some of the issues that younger people can face. Thanks so much Emily

The power of the ‘patient voice.’

The power of the 'patient voice.'

This week has been an incredibly busy, but extremely satisfying one. On Tuesday I was the guest speaker at St Georges Hospital in London, where I was invited to talk to a selection of staff and patients about my personal journey and  how it has affected my life. This was a fantastic opportunity for everyone to learn from each other, and particularly to help staff understand things from the patient perspective. This particular engagement meant a lot to me as of course it is my own hospital, and an opportunity to engage with the staff in a very different way to the normal patient/Consultant relationship. All of the staff had read and heard about my work, but few had actually seen me present live. Patients had also been invited, all

Working for Change in The Cancer Community

Working for Change in The Cancer Community

Chris describes how through his work he supports people living with cancer and challenges the status quo to make changes for the better in the cancer community.

Fundraising and the #IceBucketChallenge

Fundraising and the #IceBucketChallenge

Normally when I select a subject to write about I try and choose one that is rarely discussed. But today I have broken my own rule by selecting the Ice Bucket Challenge. I am on social media a lot, and this is the one subject that has dominated my feeds this week. I have even read many pieces in the press about it, so I thought if I can’t beat them I will join them, and add some of my own thoughts to the debate. Firstly I have to declare, that I have my own fund within my hospital, which I raise money for on an ad hoc basis, to purchase specialist equipment for the ward that looks after me. There are no admin costs to run the fund and I discuss with

Coping with loss

Coping with loss

From a personal health perspective, this week has been a very positive one. I have seen two lots of doctors and both agree that my progress is such that my treatment should be reduced further. Meaning that if we continue at this rate I may be off all treatment by Christmas. If this happens, it will be the first time since my diagnosis in 2007 that I will be without any treatment at all! My days of counting chickens are well behind me, but things are finally moving in the right direction for me, and I will take any positives I can. However, in the work I do, I am never far from reality, and this week, two of my ‘community’ have lost their fathers. I have been with them

The gold standard in cancer support

The gold standard in cancer support

  In my previous post, I mentioned that I had been invited to stay at a hotel for people affected by cancer and life threatening illnesses. That experience was probably one of the most uplifting I have had in recent years, but yet again I am writing this post with a large degree of frustration, and as we get further into the piece you will understand why. I consider myself very privileged to do the work I do and meet so many wonderful people. The ‘asks’ I receive are varied, but I will only ever consider projects if I can see some tangible results in the short term. So when I was invited to visit  The Grove Hotel in Bournemouth and check out their facilities for people affected by cancer, I was

Has cancer made me selfish?

Has cancer made me selfish?

I know, no one likes to consider themselves as selfish, especially me! But my encounter with cancer has made me wonder. Other people are always my concern, and the joy I receive in my life has always come from doing things for others. However, when cancer struck, my world turned on it’s head. Instead of me being a part of my family focus, I became the entire focus. Every where I went, people wanted to know about what was happening to me. Of course, I spent a long time in hospital, with chemotherapy, transplant and various complications, and I was the focus there too. Due to the complexities of my disease and treatment I required a lot of time and care from people. I was a very good giver, but a