Archive for the chemotherapy Category

The gold standard in cancer support

The gold standard in cancer support

see this page   In my previous post, I mentioned that I had been invited to stay at a hotel for people affected by cancer and life threatening illnesses. That experience was probably one of the most uplifting I have had in recent years, but yet again I am writing this post with a large degree of frustration, and as we get further into the piece you will understand why. I consider myself very privileged to do the work I do and meet so many wonderful people. The ‘asks’ I receive are varied, but I will only ever consider projects if I can see some tangible results in the short term. So when I was invited to visit  The Grove Hotel in Bournemouth and check out their facilities for people affected by cancer, I was

The reality of living in a permanent shadow

The reality of living in a permanent shadow

Despite, the fact that I don’t work, my weeks are never boring. My trips to hospital use a lot of my time, and I have calculated that in every month, I spend a complete week at hospital. I have had to become very selective in the projects that I am able to get involved in, so that I allow myself, enough recovery time between treatment. My reality is that I am unable to do the things that my brain remembers I used to manage! It has taken me a long time to come to terms with that. I watch enviously as my friends fill up their social lives, and plan holidays. Remembering those days, as if they were yesterday. Now, there are times when an evening out can feel like

Life after cancer, for a young person. (Samantha)

Life after cancer, for a young person. (Samantha)

One of the biggest things that I have learned, since I was diagnosed, is that outside your circle of family and friends, it is extremely difficult to find emotional or practical support to enable you to start living again.Once you are diagnosed, you have a new ‘life companion.’ If you are lucky enough to get into remission, it is very difficult to feel that you have completely broken your association with the disease. I have been talking and blogging about these issues, as I feel that they are rarely mentioned to patients.Cancer has totally turned my life upside down, and I was a very competent and confident person, before this process started. It now feels that I have been thrown into a pool without being taught how to swim. Yes,