Archive for the Lymphoma Category

Blood cancer and stem cell transplants

Blood cancer and stem cell transplants

Although I had decided this weeks blog subject, very early on, I am always open to flexibility, if  something important comes up. It did, but ironically it included the subject I had decided to write about! Via Twitter, I received a link, to another blog, written by an incredible young lady, who had experienced personally some things, which confirmed the subject matter of today’s post.  This week I wanted to focus on how lives can be affected as much by the treatment they receive, as the cancer itself. I have spent the last 4 years, having treatment for the side effects of the original treatment I had, to keep my cancer at bay. During this time I have met, and continue to meet, people affected similarly to me. My body, frequently wants to

My belief drives me on.

My belief drives me on.

I had already decided a few days ago, what I was going to write about this week, but just before I started writing, I was told of the death of my friend Rory Morrison, who was a broadcaster on BBC Radio 4. Like a lot of people in my life now, cancer had brought us together. We first met at an awards evening for The Lymphoma Association. I asked if I could have a picture taken for my blog, and we then started talking. We had so much in common, including, a rare aggressive lymphoma. I knew that Rory was facing some of the treatment that I had already encountered, including a stem-cell transplant and high dose chemo. We decided to stay in touch, and via social media, I shared numerous stages

Life after cancer, for a young person. (Samantha)

Life after cancer, for a young person. (Samantha)

One of the biggest things that I have learned, since I was diagnosed, is that outside your circle of family and friends, it is extremely difficult to find emotional or practical support to enable you to start living again.Once you are diagnosed, you have a new ‘life companion.’ If you are lucky enough to get into remission, it is very difficult to feel that you have completely broken your association with the disease. I have been talking and blogging about these issues, as I feel that they are rarely mentioned to patients.Cancer has totally turned my life upside down, and I was a very competent and confident person, before this process started. It now feels that I have been thrown into a pool without being taught how to swim. Yes,

“How are you?”

“How are you?” This is possibly the most common greeting that we use today. In fact we probably use it so frequently, that we have almost forgotten what it actually means. It is a question, not a statement and therefore prompts an answer, which may then start a conversation! In truth, that is not what we necessarily want to do. What we are actually doing is acknowledging that person. “I’m fine” is generally the answer which comes back, and for most of us that is probably a relief, as we will not then get involved in a heavy conversation.We all have issues of course, in most instances, not really of interest to anyone else, and if they were, possibly far too complex to be discussing in a brief encounter. However, when I

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