Survivorship, A Clinicians Perspective!

Survivorship, A Clinicians Perspective!

Lyrica online without prescription With thanks to my recent collaboration with the Academy of Fabulous Stuff run by Roy Lilley and Doctor Terri Porrett I am having many more conversations with N.H.S health professionals who are interested in my views around cancer support. Of course we have different perspectives of the problems but I am yet to find anyone who doesn’t agree these services could be a whole lot better. Below is a piece written by Dr Oliver Minton, after a conversation we had recently. Purely by chance Ollie is a Consultant at my own hospital, and he gives his own views on the subject! (Please note that the picture used in this piece is NOT Dr Minton) “I was invited to attend the inaugural cancer survivorship conference in Brussels—at the time our interests aligned (and

Changing Our Treatment Approach

Changing Our Treatment Approach

For many years, cancer has been considered a death sentence, and people were very pleased just to survive a diagnosis. Our clinicians would do what they could to rid us of this terrible disease, without too much thought of what our lives would look like afterwards. Now, many more of us are surviving which is great news, but struggling with the after effects of treatment. Not just physical but emotional and psychological too. What we have done previously is just really treat the physical symptoms, without thinking how that will affect us mentally. Today we have learned that to be really successful when treating people affected by cancer we need to use a much more holistic approach, dealing with the mind and body together. Helping your mind and body heal together

Trying To Find Work After Cancer?

Trying To Find Work After Cancer?

In recent weeks I have been asked several times, to talk about the issues of work and cancer, and during my presentations I have heard some very powerful personal stories about the practical issues involved. There was an extremely positive story, where a position was created especially for someone who could no longer do their previous work because of their illness, but all the rest have been terrible. Child care, financial and benefit issues, and a total lack of opportunity once cancer is declared as a disability have been all too common. The massive positive though is that as I have continually worked to publicise these issues I have been invited to share my experiences and collaborate with decision makers in the N.H.S who want to understand better how we

And Still They Come!

And Still They Come!

This week has been an incredibly busy and eventful one for all of us of course, and in honesty I didn’t really have time to write this post, but following my ‘up close and personal’ experiences of the continuing emotional impact of cancer I just had to sit down and write, whilst the memories were still fresh! Naturally all the focus has been on our vote to stay in or out of the European Union, and the consequential fallout from our decision to leave. But whatever our views of that decision, our lives will still go on and the issues of everyday life have to be dealt with. Whilst the politicians continue bitching with each other, the issues of cancer will not just go away, and this week I have been truly shocked at

We Must Continue To Share!

We Must Continue To Share!

Every week is interesting with the work I do, you just never really know what will happen. Also when you plan something, you never quite know how things will go, and it seems that we constantly need to adapt to ever changing demands. What people require these days is quite fluid, and because something was good a few months ago doesn’t make it right for now. Personally I quite like that challenge as it ensures that you are always as good as you can be and are never really complacent. I am constantly collaborating behind the scenes with everyone to ensure that what we are doing is what people actually want. My great joy is looking at new ways to offer our work and through my charity, and social media,

Living With The Side Effects

Living With The Side Effects

I had already decided the subject for this weeks blog when I spoke to an old lady, who was looking very lost in our local supermarket. As usual my wife was trying to hurry me up, but as most of you know I do like to talk to people, and this poor lady appeared to be very confused. Naturally I asked if I could help with anything and she immediately started telling me about how her husband had died of cancer recently. Wow, I thought, why has this happened? She had no family, and had not spoken to a medical person since. In a short time I did my best to recommend that she seek professional help. But that meeting has had a profound effect on me! My wife calls

“And Breathe!’

"And Breathe!'

I hadn’t actually realised the toll that the last few months was taking on me, and I was starting to see my upcoming first ever cruise, as an obstacle to continuing the things I was doing. Particularly dealing with my late Mum’s  affairs which are becoming more complex. Adding to that some important meetings, then the uncertainty of health during travelling, I was starting to feel unsure about my break as we were driving to Southampton to join the ship. We rarely are able to take holidays due to my unreliable health, but this trip was an opportunity to experience something we had never done before, unusual at my age! As much as anything Mrs L deserved the break, and to be waited on hand and foot. As we had never cruised before

The Emotional Turmoil Of Living With Cancer

The Emotional Turmoil Of Living With Cancer

Since I started 2016 and threw caution to the wind to broaden my work reach, the time has absolutely flashed past, which has been fantastic, as I have been involved in so many exciting projects around the world. Most importantly I have now started my own charity, which has opened up many different opportunities. The massive positive I have found is that my mind is fully occupied and I have very little time to consider my own health, which is a great bonus. Of course I realise that I can’t do things in the way that most healthy people can, but if I’m honest I have got fed up with living my life in such a cautious way. Not doing many things I want to, and being tired all the