We Are Stuck On The Cancer Care Roundabout!

We Are Stuck On The Cancer Care Roundabout!

When I ask my friends how their work is going the most popular response is “same s..t different day!” Working in the area of cancer support, I now experience that. The people are wonderful, so no problems there but when talking to those who are well paid to find solutions in the sector, I am hit by a terrible feeling of deja vu. Professional conferences that cost a lot of money, all take a very similar format. Guest speakers, PowerPoint slides showing that things will be better in the future. There are generally very few patients invited to attend, who are then made to feel grateful for what they receive, from whichever organisation is running it. Every year we are promised things will be better. The analogy I can use

Does The Cancer World NEED The ‘Fear Factor’ For Income?

Does The Cancer World NEED The 'Fear Factor' For Income?

During my visit to Palestine, the one very shocking thing that I quickly became aware of, was that everyone I met thought their cancer was a death sentence. This is something that has followed down the generations and will take a long time to change. But the facts are quite different from that. Naturally there are many issues there that make things difficult, but so many more of us are living with cancer, than dying of it. Obviously the earlier the disease is detected the better chance of survival we have.  I have come from the generation where cancer (The Big C) as it was known was certainly not discussed openly in my family. My Dad died of bowel cancer and my Mum had breast cancer and survived for more

Sharing Cancer Experiences In Jerusalem And Palestine

Sharing Cancer Experiences In Jerusalem And Palestine

Cancer has taken so much from me, and on many occasions I couldn’t see what the ‘new me’ could give to the world. Lacking so many of the ‘ingredients’ that made up the ‘old me,’ I struggled to find any enthusiasm to carry on. But now I find myself at the centre of the incredible changes that are happening in the cancer world. Patients are finding their voice and finally healthcare is listening. This is not just in the UK but across the world. Innovation is happening quickly and it seems like the clunky corporates are being replaced with caring community organisations, as it is finally seen that a large one size fits all approach is no longer appropriate. I have just returned from a trip to Palestine and Jerusalem,

“Is My Work Still Relevant?”

"Is My Work Still Relevant?"

Having always worked in a fast moving business I understand the importance of remaining ‘relevant.’ You are only as good as your last deal! If you don’t keep your work innovative you will quickly be lost. As I find myself now in the business of cancer, this is even more important. With social media available to everyone, and blogging being very common amongst people affected by cancer, I find myself asking that question now. My website has been going for nearly seven years now, and I do try to ensure that my subject matter is fresh, but the format has changed little. It is as good as it can be, I worried that this might be stale now, particularly with many fab bloggers/vloggers and the like entering the market. I

Time To Talk Hospice?

Time To Talk Hospice?

Working against cancer is truly an international job. That sounds a lot worse than it really is. Social media and technology has made it very easy to physically share and communicate, but of course there has to be a will, which I don’t see too much of generally. This is because everyone is worried about their share of the ‘cancer cash’ Personally I love sharing ideas, and thankfully there are others out there that feel the same. My work is now truly international, not only online, but physically too. Speaking in many incredible countries with great audiences. So many of the issues are the same of course, but with regional peculiarities, and most of us are waking up to that fact. This week I am sharing a piece from my

Are The Giant Charity Brands Exhausting Their Trust?

Are The Giant Charity Brands Exhausting Their Trust?

As most of you are well aware, I am concerned about the way many of our giant cancer charities behave towards the people they purport to help. Working in a dictatorial manner backed up by aggressive advertising, funded by many trusting donors. Much of my work involves charities and my own experience shows me clearly two types. The ones that work very closely with others and those that don’t, who are now beginning to be isolated and out of touch despite their current income! The most dangerous thing that I see, is that these are the largest ones, and I believe that their loud voices, backed by a never ending stream of all channel advertising, are strangling innovation. They believe they know best and they will give you only their

Cancer Messes With Your Head!

Cancer Messes With Your Head!

Within the last few weeks, I have taken my entire family to Disneyworld in Florida, which was #1 on my bucket list. This was all planned last year, as I know that time and health are catching up with me. We wanted to see at first hand our grandchildren enjoying the wonders of Florida, and it was the beautiful time that we imagined it would be. As soon as we returned, we were celebrating our 40th wedding anniversary! Both massive events in my life, that we never thought we would ever see. My cancer work is leading to many influential meetings and additional international interest. All those years of learning and experience finally taking me to a place I can really affect things for people affected by cancer. But the conflict

The Gift Of Growing Up

The Gift Of Growing Up

I can’t believe that I am approaching the age of sixty two. Not just because of my illness, but in general how quickly my life has gone. Since the incredible gift of my grandchildren, I am reliving my youth for the third time, having lived it on my own initially, then with my own sons afterwards. My parents lived through the war, and saw life totally different to the way I am now. We had to struggle for every penny and were one of the last in the street to have a television, phone and car. Difficult to remember that I have seen those times. When I went to school I saw the opportunity of breaking away from the cycle of poverty that my parents had lived. I rebelled against