Just a piece in the jigsaw of life

Just a piece in the jigsaw of life

My treatment has started again in earnest this week. Unfortunately, my efforts to regain some of my life have not been successful, and after trying my treatment monthly, my graft v host disease is beginning to get a grip on my body again, and I must resume a more aggressive regime of fortnightly. I did start a self centred moan to my Consultant, who smiled. She said that I will HAVE to slow down now, and that the staff would be pleased to have my company more often! There are certainly many down sides of being in the hospital so frequently, and the treatment is tiring, but unlike chemo, it is not toxic. I am still plugged into a machine for hours but am able to focus on my thoughts.

” Am I boring without my cancer? “

" Am I boring without my cancer? "

Firstly, I would like to say that it is not me asking the above question! This came from one of my followers on Twitter, and it got me thinking. The reason that tweet had been sent, was they had found that since they were in remission, and treatment had finished, the amount of followers they had was rapidly decreasing. They had very quickly put the two things together and made that assumption. That then made me wonder, and I looked at my own life since cancer, and many other people that I know, both personally, and via social media. In several of my previous posts, particularly ‘my name is not cancer,’ I have talked about the fact that whether we like it or not, we tend to be seen as that

The blogging revolution in healthcare

The blogging revolution in healthcare

Several blogs ago I mentioned that my diary was mostly empty and I was enjoying it that way. My major professional engagements were successfully completed, and it was now time to review my strategy for the rest of the year.Emails and phone calls then came along, with some varied and exciting opportunities, which set my juices flowing, so I am back in the game! I have chosen today’s subject, as a lot of the opportunities that are coming around for me,are linked in some way to my blog. Many more people are aware of what I do now, because of the power of the internet. It is such an effective method of communication. Anyone who wants to know my story, or what I am currently working on, just has to check

Sometimes it’s hard to look in the mirror.

Sometimes it's hard to look in the mirror.

For the first time since I started this blog, I thought I might be suffering ‘bloggers block.’ Not as painful as it sounds! Nothing had really grabbed my imagination, but then I received two ‘tweet pics’, from people who are going through transplant, and bumped into a lady in clinic who I hadn’t seen for ages. I struggled to recognise any of them. With a combination of the drugs and treatment, they were going through, their physical appearance had changed dramatically. All three had lost their hair and a lot of weight.Despite my own personal experiences, and knowledge, I am always shocked to see the effects of that on the body. Changing appearances, is a common issue for people with long term illness, and I had written the below piece last

Life wants to wake us, when we start to dream!

Life wants to wake us, when we start to dream!

Normal service has been resumed in my life. Conferences successfully completed, and treatment has recommenced. Actually, there is a lot to be said for routine. You know where you are with it! Like a comfy pair of slippers. The odd incident of excitement is enough to stimulate me through ‘normal’ now. Maybe that is an age thing, possibly my health dictates that now, as excitement was a major motivating factor in my life. Always pushing the boundaries, and trying new things, normal was boring. Now I think twice before going to a different restaurant! I don’t really know how that has happened. Visiting hospital for two days, gives me the opportunity, of meeting yet more inspiring people, and always starts me thinking. Now, after 6 years, I am a ‘veteran,’ and nothing

Carers, our unsung heroes! Fiona’s story

Carers, our unsung heroes! Fiona's story

We all know what the word carer means, but many carers would not consider themselves to be one! Husbands, wives, friends and family, are doing what they consider natural, helping those of us that need it. Without their help, life would be, in many instances, impossible. In my own case, ever since I was diagnosed, my wife has swung into action, taking care of everything that I couldn’t manage at times. Putting up with my awful moods, sorting out my medication, and at times dressing me and driving me to appointments. She is there for me during my dark times, and she has sacrificed a lot of her life for me. Cancer now dominates my life, whether I like it or not! With my own health being constantly monitored, I use

All about the journey, not the destination.

All about the journey, not the destination.

I am writing this post just before I am a guest speaker at European Bone Marrow Transplant conference(page 7+181)  in London.So I thought that it would be an ideal time to write about how I got to this stage. When most people talk about their association with cancer, they generally use two expressions.Either their fight/battle, or journey. Personally, I rarely use ‘fight,’ as I feel that I am just doing the best I can. My preferred word is journey. I guess it is not so much a journey, as it is a ‘mystery tour,’ as we never actually know where we are heading! During my life before cancer, I always felt that I knew where I was going. My goal was to reach a healthy and wealthy retirement, enjoy some sunshine and have

Life after cancer, for a young person. (Samantha)

Life after cancer, for a young person. (Samantha)

One of the biggest things that I have learned, since I was diagnosed, is that outside your circle of family and friends, it is extremely difficult to find emotional or practical support to enable you to start living again.Once you are diagnosed, you have a new ‘life companion.’ If you are lucky enough to get into remission, it is very difficult to feel that you have completely broken your association with the disease. I have been talking and blogging about these issues, as I feel that they are rarely mentioned to patients.Cancer has totally turned my life upside down, and I was a very competent and confident person, before this process started. It now feels that I have been thrown into a pool without being taught how to swim. Yes,

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