Archive for the cancer Category

The Importance of cancer support via social media

The Importance of cancer support via social media

Since I was introduced to the world of social media, I could immediately see how powerful it might be. Certainly, like any new tool, you have to learn how to use it properly, to get the best from it. Which takes time. With trial and error you will find what it does well, and what it does, not so well. Coming from a business background, and attempting to always keep things simple, I couldn’t see what wasn’t to like, by connecting like minded people, across the world. Once I found myself taken hostage by cancer, I applied similar rules here. If I can’t find physical help for what I need, let me look on the net! I couldn’t find what I felt was required, so I thought I would try and create something. People

Do you ever feel lost?

Do you ever feel lost?

Regular readers of this blog will know that I have just returned from a weeks holiday. For a lot of people this is not such a big thing, but due to my illness and treatment regime, this is only the second time I have been abroad in 6 years. Considering that I was a regular traveller, both socially and commercially, this is a dramatic change in lifestyle for me. After struggling with my change of circumstances for many years, tossing and turning in my own life, trying to make sense of things, I have finally found a way of life that fits in with my health commitments. My treatment and hospital visits involve a strict routine, so I have had to adjust my family and work requirements around that. Everything now

How do you deal with your cancer?

How do you deal with your cancer?

Well, my previous post, where I was discussing the issues of survivorship, has become the most read, of all my pieces. It has provoked so much discussion throughout social media, which is very pleasing. Through this blog, I try and publicise issues, that people may find difficult to talk about. Also, our healthcare providers tend to ignore them, as there is not really a positive solution. I speak from my experiences as a current patient who is having treatment and spending a lot of time in the system. My pieces are up to date and based on what is actually happening. You may be reading plenty of reports from different areas, but I can tell you exactly what is happening now. My subject this week is about the contrasting ways

Are we prepared for increasing survivorship?

Are we prepared for increasing survivorship?

This question is actually not as crazy as it sounds. In the last few weeks, I have had numerous conversations with a very good cross section of people about the lack of support for people affected by cancer, once they step outside the hospital environment. Despite, the length of time of my own personal experience, I am still shocked, how little support is available. During my conversations with professionals, the biggest issue that I find is a demarcation of responsibility. My doctors, are doing their best to keep me alive. They care for all of my physical issues, either as an inpatient or by giving me drugs which I can take at home. Once I am outside of that scenario, it feels that I am on my own. My family and

“What if?”

"What if?"

In my previous post I talked about the value of time, something I am beginning to be very aware of in my life. Being on fortnightly treatment, those days become markers in my life, and they seem to come round with increased speed.In the last few weeks I have been able to fit in some really exciting projects, and I have been asked numerous times about my working life before cancer, by people I have only recently become acquainted with. Therefore they don’t know anything at all about my experience. However, they seem genuinely surprised by the variety and quality of the projects that I am involved with. This causes me an element of internal frustration! In my regular working life, I would be doing a lot of difficult negotiations, for

What value do you place on your time?

What value do you place on your time?

Back in the days when I was a full time business consultant, I was very aware of the value of my time, as I was paid by result. Generally, the harder I worked, the more I earned. For most of us, the more hours we work, the more we get paid. But take us out of the work place, and it becomes more difficult to find the value of our time. Also, we may well value our own time very differently, to how others do. This post has arisen from a chance conversation, I had with a business expert who I am in contact with via social media. I learned so much from our chat, and I was very shocked to see how much my business brain, has been suffocated,

“My wife has just joined your club!”

"My wife has just joined your club!"

When I answered the phone, a few days ago and spoke to a friend of mine, I started with our normal banter about football. We usually discuss the latest rumours surrounding our football club, who we should or shouldn’t sign, and general ‘man rubbish.’ However this time was different. There was a very quick break in proceedings, and my pal announced that his wife had joined my club! For a minute, my mind went blank, and I assumed that he meant she had signed up to receive my blog notifications. He then very quickly followed that, by saying that his wife had been diagnosed with cancer! That conversation prompted this weeks post. Due to my own personal situation, and the work that I do, I am talking cancer, on a daily

My belief drives me on.

My belief drives me on.

I had already decided a few days ago, what I was going to write about this week, but just before I started writing, I was told of the death of my friend Rory Morrison, who was a broadcaster on BBC Radio 4. Like a lot of people in my life now, cancer had brought us together. We first met at an awards evening for The Lymphoma Association. I asked if I could have a picture taken for my blog, and we then started talking. We had so much in common, including, a rare aggressive lymphoma. I knew that Rory was facing some of the treatment that I had already encountered, including a stem-cell transplant and high dose chemo. We decided to stay in touch, and via social media, I shared numerous stages